The Power of “Yet” Part 3

adult-1807500_960_720Julie Nemeth, Ph.D., is a mother and therapist who lives in Philadelphia with her husband and two sons. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a private practice in Center City, specializing in fertility issues, pregnancy, and parenting, as well as healing from eating concerns and childhood trauma.


Parenting beyond the ABCs

Although much of the material on Growth Mindset and the Power of Yet (see my previous two posts) focus on children’s academic development, these concepts also inform children’s social and emotional development! To address this, Carlye Nelson-Major, the person who first introduced me to these concepts, and I discussed, at length, three aspects of emotional intelligence, including:

* tolerating anxiety

* acquiring empathy

* exercising forgiveness Continue reading

The Power of “Yet” Part 2

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Photo by Humphrey Muleba on Unsplash

Julie Nemeth, Ph.D., is a mother and therapist who lives in Philadelphia with her husband and two sons. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a private practice in Center City, specializing in fertility issues, pregnancy, and parenting, as well as healing from eating concerns and childhood trauma.

Four Principles of Parenting with the Power of Yet

In her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Dr. Carol Dwek talks about parenting from a Growth Mindset (see my last post for a definition of this concept). She devotes almost an entire chapter in her book to this topic and the Internet is full of information – on-line courses, power point presentations, workbooks, videos (a couple great ones by Sesame Street) and books for kids of all ages using the concept of the Growth Mindset.

Knowing that I learn best in dialogue with others, I reviewed many of the websites and then, turned to the person who first introduced me to this concept – Carlye Nelson-Major.

Carlye is a long-time educator and expert in child development. Additionally, she is a mother of two adult children (and a grandmother of three young children). Recently, I had the privilege to discuss with her “the power of yet” and how parents can nurture a Growth Mindset in their children.

Here are some of the many topics we explored along with four essential components of parenting with the power of yet: Continue reading

The Power of “Yet” Part 1

Children Outdoors Playing Balloons TogetherJulie Nemeth, Ph.D., is a mother and therapist who lives in Philadelphia with her husband and two sons. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a private practice in Center City, specializing in fertility issues, pregnancy, and parenting, as well as healing from eating concerns and childhood trauma.

A few days ago I overheard my two boys playing with a balloon in the next room. My younger son’s voice began to quiver from tears as he explained that he couldn’t hit the balloon high in the air. My older son quickly responded, “not yet.” As I heard this, my heart filled with joy! My older son understood that a little word like “yet” gave his brother hope that someday, with practice and persistence, he would hit the balloon higher.

I spoke about the power of yet in my last entry (https://thoughtfulparenting.org/2018/10/15/reflections-of-starting-school-again/)

In that blog post, I noted that by simply adding the word “yet” we could tell our kids we believe in them. The Power of Yet was introduced and developed by Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D. in her groundbreaking book,  Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.

To bring the Power of Yet into our lives as parents it is essential to develop a nuanced understanding of a Growth Mindset. Continue reading

Now For Another Topic You Won’t Want to Talk to Your Children About: Sexting

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Photo by Brett Sayles from Pexels
Dr. Corinne Masur
On this blog we try to provide guidance for parents on how to talk about difficult topics with children– sex, death, and now, sexting.

You might think that talking to your children about sexting isn’t necessary, but it’s a fact that by middle school, most kids know what sexting is and they probably know who in their class has done it.  They may have seen photos that kids they know have sent out of themselves – or parts of themselves – unclothed.

And this isn’t the only reason to talk with your children about sexting. It’s a conversation that can open the door to many subjects: How can we communicate our interest in someone? How can we communicate in a healthy way once we are in a relationship? How can we set limits on what we are comfortable with and not comfortable with in a relationship – any relationship – including friendships, relationships with people of the opposite sex, etc.

Continue reading

Sharenting

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Dr. Corinne Masur

It used to be that friends and family exchanged stories about their children at get togethers.  The children under discussion were often there and could say “Oh, Mom!” or “Oh, Dad!” and everyone would laugh.  And, after the party, the child could yell at the mother or discuss with the father how they felt about the story that was shared.

Now stories about children, information about children, and images of children are shared by parents all the time– and without the child’s awareness,  It’s done online and for various reasons. Sometimes the child looks adorable or has accomplished something, sometimes the parents want to share information about their child’s ongoing development, sometimes the parent is looking for support because some aspect of their parenting is difficult.  And sometimes parents share in order to meet their own needs for gratification– to see how many likes they can get, how much support they can get for themselves, etc. And regardless of parental motivation, the today’s audience includes not only friends and family, but often strangers with varying agendas of their own.

Is it time to rethink our sharing of information about our children and images of them?

Continue reading